Asean Social Work Journal https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><img src="https://www.aseansocialwork.com/public/site/images/kartika/peta-asean-fix.jpg" alt="" width="1263" height="851" /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <p><strong>ASEAN Social Work Journal (ASWJ) </strong>is an international social work journal, double-blind peer-reviewed, open-access journal mandated by the ASEAN Social Work Consortium (ASWC) to be published by the country of Indonesia, specifically the Indonesian Social Work Consortium (ISWC).</p> <p>ISWC was established on the 10th of August, 2011, in Jakarta-Indonesia, following the ASEAN Social Work Consortium (ASWC) at a regional level in Manila, the Philippines. The primary mandate of ISWC is to facilitate strategic initiatives for promoting roles of social work profession and education. The ASEAN Social Work Journal is one of the initiatives that comply with these purposes. It is part of the Knowledge Management work plan formulated by ASWC.</p> <p style="text-align: justify; background: white;"><strong><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Arial',sans-serif; color: #333333;">ASEAN Social Work Journal (ASWJ) </span></strong><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Arial',sans-serif; color: #333333;">is an international social work journal, double-blind peer-reviewed, open-access journal mandated by the ASEAN Social Work Consortium (ASWC) to be published by the country of Indonesia, specifically the Indonesian Social Work Consortium (ISWC).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify; background: white;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Arial',sans-serif; color: #333333;">ISWC was established on the 10th of August, 2011, in Jakarta-Indonesia, following the ASEAN Social Work Consortium (ASWC) at a regional level in Manila, the Philippines. The primary mandate of ISWC is to facilitate strategic initiatives for promoting roles of social work profession and education. The ASEAN Social Work Journal is one of the initiatives that comply with these purposes. It is part of the Knowledge Management work plan formulated by ASWC.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify; background: white;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Arial',sans-serif; color: #333333;">The journal has been a member of Crossref (Prefix: 10.58671/aswj) with Online ISSN 2963-2404 and Print ISSN 2089-1075</span></p> </div> en-US aseansocialwork.journal@gmail.com (Associate Prof. Fentiny Nugroho, Ph.D) journal@aseansocialwork.com (Habibullah) Sat, 30 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.8 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Entering 2024 With Consolidation https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/63 Prof. Dr. Bambang Shergi Laksmono, MSc Copyright (c) 2023 Prof. Dr. Bambang Shergi Laksmono, MSc https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/63 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Ethics Responsibility: Using Social Media of Social Work Practice in Thailand https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/54 <p>This study aims to develop communication guidelines for social workers using social media. Thematic analysis of documents and reviews was used as the research methodology. The importance of understanding the use of social media in social work practice and the need for guidelines to ensure professional ethics are upheld. The guidelines incorporate legal knowledge and standards, including relevant laws such as the Kingdom of Thailand 2017 Constitution and the Social Work Profession Act 2013. Emphasise the importance of digital literacy, technology literacy, and ethical communication skills to communicate with clients and multidisciplinary teams effectively. The Thailand Council of Social Work Professions has presented guidelines for public communication for social work professionals. The guidelines stress the importance of social workers considering the best interests of their clients when providing online services. e-professionalism is also essential for social workers to explore ethical considerations in the digital world.</p> Kath Khangpiboon, Panrat Nimtaluong , Ronnarong Jundai Copyright (c) 2023 Kath Khangpiboon, Panrat Nimtaluong , Ronnarong Jundai https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/54 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 The Occupational Wellness Concerns and Self-Care Strategies of Filipino Medical Social Workers During The COVID-19 Pandemic https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/44 <p><em>Given the intense demands imposed on medical social workers (MSWs) during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are vulnerable to developing occupational wellness concerns (OWCs): physical, social, emotional, mental, or spiritual issues caused by work-related factors. OWCs adversely affect the occupational wellness of the worker and the quality of service given to clients. One approach to reduce OWCs is professional self-care. This study explored the experiences of Filipino MSWs during the pandemic, the OWCs experienced, their self-care strategies, and their impact on professional practice. Face-to-face, Zoom, and email interviews were conducted with 10 MSWs who were part of the skeletal workforce of four (4) hospitals in Metro Manila. The findings showed that OWCs were caused by their commitment to professional duty, intense workload, and health and safety risks. This resulted in conflict with coworkers, desire to quit work, undesirable work attitudes, unhealthy habits, and disruption in the quality of service provision. Meanwhile, professional self-care led to enhanced work performance, improved relations with coworkers and clients, enhanced cognitive ability, increased self-awareness, and acted as a first aid response to combat OWCs. Insights on hospital limitations, supportive mechanisms, social work as an undervalued versus satisfying profession, motivation, and professionalism during the pandemic were also documented. </em></p> Patricia Marie Imperial, Veronique Ann Claire Abes, Michael John Ronquillo, Mari Allana Corazon Vilegas Copyright (c) 2023 Patricia Marie Imperial, Veronique Ann Claire A. Abes A. Abes, Michael John Ronquillo, Mari Allana Corazon Vilegas https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/44 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Working with the Elite: the Intersection of Social Work and Corporate Foundations - the Case of Zuellig Family Foundation https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/47 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Social Work draws from various disciplines but is perceived to be the direct opposite of corporate work, however, there is a need to work with the elite for the sake of social development due to their available resources and skills that social workers lack. While Corporate Social Responsibility typically takes the form of dole-outs on a voluntary basis, it has begun to transition into building partnerships with communities. Data from the Local Health System program of Zuellig Family Foundation was examined to (a) describe the developmental principles used by an elite foundation for the development and implementation of their program, (b) determine the intersection of the operations of the program with the Empowerment Theory and Developmental Perspective as practiced by the Social Work profession, and (c) discuss the role of social workers in corporate-led programs. Despite the surface differences of social work and corporate work, foundations of the elite can be effective contributors to social change and development, and can work with the Social Work profession in empowering communities that suffer from inequities. The findings of the study indicate that social work professionals and other humanities professions must explore partnerships with corporate-led foundations to deepen knowledge bases and ensure social development.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong>Keywords:</strong> <em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Social Work profession, Corporate Social Responsibility, Empowerment Theory, Developmental Perspective, Zuellig Family Foundation, Local Health System, partnership</span></em></p> Suzanne Magalona Nazal, Nadya Ysabelle Dizon, Quiel Alec Caguimbal Endaya Copyright (c) 2023 Suzanne Magalona-Nazal Nazal, Nadya Ysabelle Dizon, Quiel Endaya https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/47 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Does Regionalism Work in Managing the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Case Study of ASEAN https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/43 <p><em>This article attempts to examine ASEAN’s response to and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, including through the </em><em>implementation</em><em> of the ASEAN Comprehensive Recovery Framework (ACRF). It is aimed to contribute to the existing literature by providing an applicable and valuable research on policy analysis by addressing the existing research evidence and the current research gaps on the response to the COVID-19 pandemic at the regional level, as well as what ASEAN brings to the regional security and prosperity. </em></p> <p><em>&nbsp;</em></p> <p><strong><em>Keywords: ASEAN, pandemic, recovery, regional, security </em></strong></p> Casandra Aleksia Copyright (c) 2023 Casandra Aleksia https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/43 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Mobility for a Better Life: A Fragmented Story of the Migrant https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/50 <p>Almost all nations in the world are affected by the migration phenomena, which is becoming more and more widespread and complex. Although they are frequently connected to the concept of globalization in general, the broad social, economic, and political grounds of this movement are varied and not always necessarily known. This paper introduces qualitative research findings from the semi-structured interview with the migrant, who made up her mind to change her life by moving from her home country to Poland in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The paper utilized such concepts as migration, student mobility, culture shock, the COVID-19 crisis, and social service provision to analyze the findings of the interview. The results from the interview demonstrate the fragmented story full of challenges that the migrant experienced including cultural adaptation, economic constraints, and social support. Despite challenges, the interview participant was able to look at her life opportunistically and gladly shared her story filled with kind people and lessons learned. On the example of one story, this qualitative research helps to reveal some gaps in the social support and migration systems to be improved as well as foresee some issues with migration restrictions in the future. </p> Leila Salimova Copyright (c) 2023 Leila Salimova https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/50 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Online Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children in Camarines Sur, Bicol Region, Philippines https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/37 <p>The culture within the family and community generally affects people's attitudes and acceptance towards using available technology. Alternately, technology can also influence the culture and social behaviors of people. This study aimed to discuss the family and community factors and their unintentional contribution to the prevalence of Online Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children (OSAEC) and explore the community's perspectives of OSAEC. Utilizing a qualitative approach, it employed focus group discussions and interviews to obtain relevant data and insights from the participants. Based on thematic analysis, family factors include (1) unsupervised access to the internet and gadgets, (2) children disregarding their parents' reminders on gadget usage, and (3) parents' lack of knowledge on the use of phones and the internet. In terms of community factors, (1) poor socioeconomic conditions, (2) limited community initiatives to capacitate parents on online media risks and OSAEC, and (3) limited knowledge of emerging child protection issues may have contributed to OSAEC cases. Furthermore, the study found that community members view OSAEC as a cybercrime involving showing and sending obscene pictures, texts, or videos without physical contact. Given the findings, establishing appropriate mechanisms for responsible online use and online behavior is vital to ensure proactiveness in protecting children against abuse and exploitation at family and community levels</p> Ma. Vida Teresa Sales, Angelo Uclaray, Russ Daniel Baldoza, Joselynn Niñofranco, Cherry Dycoco, Tania Añonuevo, Myrna Pereyra Copyright (c) 2023 Ma. Vida Teresa Sales, Angelo Uclaray, Russ Daniel Baldoza, Joselynn Niñofranco, Cherry Dycoco, Tania Añonuevo, Myrna Pereyra https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/37 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000 Resilient Social Work Practice: From the Experiences of Filipino Social Workers https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/56 <p>'Resilience' refers to a person's capacity to handle difficulties, demands and pressure without experiencing negative effects. The concept of resilience draws from and reinforces a strengths perspective. The term refers to the belief that we have personal wisdom and capacity to persevere and grow from experience. Adopting a resilience mindset helps us to tap into these capacities and to flourish, even in the face of challenge. The pressures and demands of social work practice requires social workers to remain steadfast and strong despite all the personal and professional challenges. Since our country experiences many challenges like natural and manmade disaster and the COVID 19. There are evidence that social workers had experience mental and emotional fatigue. A study which aims to describe Resilient social work practice and actual experiences of Filipino Social Workers both personally and professionally amidst challenges and pandemic is needed to shed some light on how Filipino Social Workers deals with all these difficulties. Specifically, the study answers the following questions: 1. What is their perspective of resilient social work? 2.What are examples of resilience as practice by social workers on a personal and professional level? 3.How do social workers build resilience in professional practice? 4. In what ways (what aspect of their personal and professional level) did the participants practice Resiliency? Through online platform social workers in Davao Region from different social work settings participated in the study descriptive-qualitative research and concluded that social workers utilized various resiliency tools both personal and professional in their practice in dealing with clients in various organizations.</p> Amelyn Laro Copyright (c) 2023 Amelyn Laro https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://aseansocialwork.com/index.php/asw/article/view/56 Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +0000